Condition

Condition can vary from one seller to another.  At MAPSandART.com we strive to offer art, prints and maps in the best condition we can, knowing that no piece is perfect or in mint condition.  Each piece has its own history and may have been handled by several people over the centuries.  In other words you should expect minor flaws to be present on all pieces.

All pieces for sale have a description of the condition of the piece.  Most of the time we will just note that the piece is either Fair, Good or Very Good and sometimes we will add some further notes to tell you about any visible faults we have noticed.  Further down we will describe some of the notes we may list and what they mean.  These qualifications are subjective and are meant as an indication to guide you in your purchase.  For those that are attentive to infinite detail, we must warn you that you will always find some flaw in our pieces and that is because they are either old or have been “previously-owned”.

“Very Good” means that the condition of the piece is free of major flaws.

“Good” means that the condition of the piece is nice, but some imperceptible flaws such as minuscule repairs, a bit of foxing, buckling, a few creases, wrinkles, minor stain, scratches, wormhole or such.  In any case the flaws will be minor in our opinion and the piece still deserve our qualification of “Good”.

“Fair” means that the piece has some obvious flaws, but is still fine to frame.

Many of our pieces have had their margins trimmed prior to our acquisition or by us for aesthetic reasons.

If the artwork, antique print or map is in a reasonably typical condition for its age the specifics of condition will be omitted.  Customers should expect minor flaws to be present and also some repairs to have taken place.  Rest assured that all repairs have been done with great care using acid-free materials.

For noticeable flaws that may not appear on the images we provide on www.MapsAndArt.com we will provide notes for each piece on the product page.  Noticeable flaws that we will mention are:

Buckled: Buckling is when the piece has been exposed to humidity and has lost its flatness.  The piece will then be buckled and will be visible as such when you frame it, however many people do not consider this a flaw and rather enjoy the look.

Collated pages: In some cases we have pasted together two separate pages usually from a book.  We bring the images together and match up the lines as much as possible.  This is not actually a flaw, but rather an additional service that we have offered at no extra charge in order to bring to you pieces that may not have been desirable as two seperate pages.

Crease(s): Creases refer to unintentional folds in the paper that were not meant to be there when the piece was made.  These are often found in the corners as a bent corner.  We strive to remove the crease as much as possible, but when they are very noticeable we will list them as creased.

Foxing: This refers to the presence of strong spotting which is called foxing. Foxing occurs due to mold when the piece was exposed to a humid environment before we acquired it.  It is expected that the occasional presence of some minor foxing be present, in such cases we do not mention foxing.  We mention foxing when the piece is noticeably freakled with spots above what can be usually expected of a piece depending on its age.

Minor repair(s): These refer to long tears of up to one inch that have been repaired.  We will list how many are present.  For example, when we say 2 minor repairs that means that the piece described has two tears of less than one inch each that have been repaired.  A common place for such repairs are along the centerfold of a piece if a centerfold is present or along the margins of the piece.

Major repair(s): These refer to long tears of over one inch that have been repaired.  We will list how many are present.  For example, when we say 2 major repairs that means that the piece described has two tears of more than one inch each that has been repaired.

Minor loss(es) repaired: This refers to an original portion of a piece of artwork, antique print or old map that was missing and that we have replaced with a similar piece of paper with much care in trying to match the texture and age of the original.  We have thousands of “scraps” that we use to make these repairs.  For example, if we mention a minor loss repair on an old manuscript of the late 1700s we will repair it with a piece of paper from the late 1700s and try to match the tone of the paper as much as possible.  In these repairs only archival wheat paste is used as a glue.

Major loss(es) repaired: Very rarely do we provide a piece in this condition.  If we do, it is because it is either a rare piece or the price is very low to reflect the damage.  Major loss repair refers to an original portion of a piece of artwork, antique print or old map that was missing and that we have replaced with a similar piece of paper with much care in trying to match the texture and age of the original.  As for minor loss repair we take great care in matching the paper and using the right materials.  A major loss repair will be a repair for a loss of original paper of over one square inch.

Offsetting:  This occurs when the piece has been in contact with another piece of paper over a long period of time and some of the opposing page has transfered onto the piece we have for sale.  We only mention offsetting when the transfer is very obvious.

Scratch(es): Occasionally the image of a piece may be scratched and will show enough for us to mention it.  Scratches happen when a  frame has dropped and the glass has cut slightly the surface of the piece.  This is one reason why we suggest framing with plexiglass rather than glass.

Stain(s): Stains come in many forms which include water, beverages, glues, ink, paint, adhesives and the like.  Stains are likely to be minor unless we specify them to be major.

Wormhole(s): These are exactly what they sound like: holes made by larvae that ate away at the piece leaving a pin hole through the paper or sometimes a trench.  We use our judgment in patching these up and will use archival materials to do so.

We hope our efforts at clarity will be useful to you.  Owners David and Natasha Deighton of www.MAPSandART.com are at your disposal if you have any questions.